Intelligence Law School - Course 1: Lesson 3.4.1 Articles I, II, & III Generally


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LESSON 3: CONSTITUTIONAL LAW


3.4 The Articles


3.4.1 Articles I, II, & III Generally


Lecture Audio



Annotated Lecture Transcript

3.4.1 Articles I, II, & III Generally

After the Preamble you have the 7 Articles.

These 7 articles make up the body of the Constitution.

The Articles lay out the structure of the federal government and divide governmental power between the federal government and the state governments.

The federal government’s powers are limited and enumerated in the text of the Constitution itself.

The power of state governments isn’t explicitly delineated.

The Tenth Amendment to the Constitution explains that whatever powers aren’t granted to the federal government by the U.S. Constitution are reserved to the state governments and to the people.

 

Of the 7 total Articles in the U.S. Constitution, the first 3 Articles are, by far, the most important.

They form the foundation for our entire federal government.

Articles I, II, and III establish the 3 branches of the federal government—the legislative branch, the executive branch, and the judicial branch—in that order.

These 3 articles also set forth the constitutional powers of each branch.

1)      Article I establishes the Legislative Branch and enumerates all of its powers.[1]

2)     Article II establishes the Executive Branch and enumerates all of its powers.[2]

3)     Article III establishes the Judicial Branch and enumerates all of its powers.[3]

Easy as pie.

3 branches. 3 articles.

1 article per branch.

 

Footnotes

[1] See Encyclopedia Britannica, Constitution of the United States of America (Student and Home Edition 2009).

[2] See Encyclopedia Britannica, Constitution of the United States of America (Student and Home Edition 2009).

[3] See Encyclopedia Britannica, Constitution of the United States of America (Student and Home Edition 2009).

 


© 2012 David Alan Jordan. All rights reserved.