Intelligence Law School - Course 1: Lesson 4.2.7 Free Statutory Law Supplement for U.S. Intelligence Law [HTML-Only]


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LESSON 4: STATUTORY LAW


4.2 Enactment and Publication of Federal Statutes


4.2.7 Free Statutory Law Supplement for U.S. Intelligence Law


Lecture Audio



Annotated Lecture Transcript

4.2.7 Free Statutory Law Supplement for U.S. Intelligence Law

To make your statutory law research and intelligence law study a little easier, I’ve done a really great thing for all you future intelligence lawyers listening to this lecture right now.

 

I’ve painstakingly scoured the United States Code and located virtually every code provision that is even slightly relevant to U.S. intelligence law.

I’ve compiled them into a single, convenient 1681-page document that can serve as your principal research reference while studying intelligence law in depth in the courses on IntelligenceLaw.com.

 

The 2010 Statutory Supplement for U.S. Intelligence Law is available right now, for free on IntelligenceLaw.com.

Just visit our Free Publications page.[1]

 

It’s completely free for non-commercial and non-governmental use, so if you’re just an individual United States person who is interested in this topic that affects you and your fellow Americans, go ahead and visit me on the web at IntelligenceLaw.com and download this invaluable resource for free.

I’ll be sure to put the link to the URL in the footnotes of the annotated transcript of this lecture.[2]

 

Ø  Nearly Comprehensive Coverage of Relevant Code Sections: This supplement was intended to be as comprehensive as I could make it, so the PDF document is massive.

o   The full document is over 1600 pages long total, so I don’t recommend printing it out.

o   It is almost completely comprehensive.

o   I say “almost” just to cover myself.

o   I suppose there might be a few ancillary provisions that may have some bearing on intelligence that I neglected to include, but not very many.

o   There are also some irrelevant sections I threw in just for the heck of it.

o   I erred on the side of inclusion.[3]

o    

Ø  Compilation Methodology: I literally went through every line of the U.S. Code personally, copying and pasting every provision relevant to U.S. intelligence law into this comprehensive statutory supplement.

o   It took me several months of pretty grueling work to complete—so if there’s anything I missed it was probably due to extreme legal research fatigue.

o   Reading the United States Code cover-to-cover is not a job for those with narcolepsy, I’ll tell you that.

§  Insomniacs like me are the only ones who have even a shot at pulling it off.

o   It’s current as of June 2010, but laws change all the time, so it’s only intended as a study aid.

o   Always be sure to update your research anytime you want to use a statute or any other legal research item in practice.

 

Footnotes

[1] Free Intelligence Law Publications, Main Page, IntelligenceLaw.com, https://intelligencelaw.com/html-only/law_books/index.html.

[2] David Alan Jordan, 2010 Statutory Supplement for U.S. Intelligence Law (2010), available at https://intelligencelaw.com/files/pdf/law_books/statutory_supplement_for_us_intelligence_law_2010.pdf.

[3] The 2010 Primary Law Supplement contains pretty much all of the organic statutes, enabling statutes, and even most of the relevant general management laws. I also included a few of the most important administrative directives as well. The full document is over 2200 pages long and contains a detailed table of contents at the top that’s formatted to allow you just hold tab and click on any section in the Table of Contents and it will take you right to it. It took me literally hundreds of hours of tedious work to prepare it, but I had to do it myself to make sure it was comprehensive—and it is. I can safely say that practically every single U.S. Code provision relevant to any aspect of intelligence agency operations are included in the supplement.

 


© 2012 David Alan Jordan. All rights reserved.