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News

Administrative Law

32 CFR § 1700.2(h)(4) [32 CFR CHAPTER XVII—OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR OF NATIONAL INTELLIGENCE: 32 CFR PART 1700—PROCEDURES FOR DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS PURSUANT TO THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT]

[…]
the term “news” means information which concerns current events, would be of current interest to the general public, would enhance the public understanding of the operations or activities of the U.S. Government, and is in fact disseminated to a significant element of the public at minimal cost; freelance journalists are included in this definition if they provide sufficient evidence to justify an expectation of publication through such an organization, even though not actually employed by it; a publication contract or prior publication record is relevant to such status;

32 CFR § 1800.2 [32 CFR CHAPTER XVIII—NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER: 32 CFR PART 1800—PUBLIC ACCESS TO NACIC RECORDS UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT (FOIA)]

For purposes of this part, the following terms have the meanings indicated:
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the term news means information which concerns current events, would be of current interest to the general public, would enhance the public understanding of the operations or activities of the U.S. Government, and is in fact disseminated to a significant element of the public at minimal cost; freelance journalists are included in this definition if they can demonstrate a solid basis for expecting publication through such an organization, even though not actually employed by it; a publication contract or prior publication record is relevant to such status;

32 CFR § 1900.02(h)(3) [32 CFR CHAPTER XIX—CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY: 32 CFR PART 1900—PUBLIC ACCESS TO CIA RECORDS UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT (FOIA)]

For purposes of this part, the following terms have the meanings indicated:
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The term “news” means information that is about current events or that would be of current interest to the public. Examples of news media entities include television or radio stations broadcasting to the public at large, and publishers of periodicals (but only in those instances when they can qualify as disseminators of “news”) who make their products available for purchase or subscription by the general public. These examples are not intended to be all-inclusive. Moreover, as traditional methods of news delivery evolve (e.g., electronic dissemination of newspapers through telecommunications services), such alternative media would be included in this category. In the case of “freelance” journalists, they may be regarded as working for a news organization if they can demonstrate a solid basis for expecting publication through that organization, even though not actually employed by it. A publication contract would be the clearest proof, but agencies may also look to the past publication record of a requestor in making this determination: